Thursday, January 24, 2013

Fairies

Tinker Mountain this morning, with snow flurries.


It's cold out there. We've liked it. It makes people just a little more creative inside, when it's cold outside.



 



.













I draw and write in some of my books. 

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

Yarn-A-Long


Yes, you're in the right place! I changed the name of my blog from What We Do to
Pilgrims at Tinker Creek.
And, the web address for Pilgrims at Tinker Creek is changing to
www.pilgrimsattinkercreek.com
For most of you, the above URL should now take you to this blog. Copy and paste the address into your browser to see it it's working.
If you follow the original URL (lisalalalala.blogspot.com) you'll be re-directed by Blogger to the new domain. Eventually you'll need to simply replace that URL with www.pilgrimsattinkercreek.com

Thanks for your patience in this exciting new transition!


It's Yarn-A-Long Wednesday... I'll be linking this post to  Small Things. Visit there to find a list a mile long of knitting projects and good books. Each week, as I read through this list, I find new books that inspire a trip to the library. I almost always see old favorites (like Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen) that nudge me toward my own bookshelf to re-read familiar stories.

Now, for my contribution: I am ALMOST DONE with Tea leaves Cardigan !



I have one half of a sleeve left to finish.



I am reading The Height of Our Mountains, Nature Writing from Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains and Shenandoah Valley. The writers who contribute to this collections begin with John Smith himself (1580-1631). His "Description of Virginia" dates to about 1612 when he wrote "The sommer is hot as in Spaine; the winter colde as in Fraunce or England." (sounds about right!) 

But listen to this: his Virginia was nowhere near the size of the present-day commonwealth (it's officially still called a commonwealth instead of a "state".) More like this: 

"The bounds therof on the East side are the Great Ocean. On the South lyeth Florida: on the North nova Francia. As for the West thereof, the limits are unknowne."

Apparently most Americans, if living back in the day, would have been Virginians! :)

Other writers include my very own favorite, Annie Dillard, whose book Pilgrim at Tinker Creek inspired the name of my blog. (see About Me).



One last thing: a few months ago, my fellow blogger Erin Hutchinson at My Patchwork Life initiated an effort to provide handmade quilts to victims of Hurricane Sandy. She has enlisted a HUGE list of quilters, some from the other side of the world, to piece together quilt blocks and/or make quilts. She then sends them on to her contact, Hilary, at "Blankie Depot" in New Jersey, I believe. Hilary coordinates the passing on of the quilts to people affected by Hurricane Sandy.

Sewists and quilters, visit her blog, My Patchwork Life, to read more and learn how you can contribute, or just read the story of her efforts and get that warm, fuzzy feeling that we crafters have when we read about handmade quilts (or handknits, for us knitters) that find their way to people who need them. :)





Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Sycamore


Yes, you're in the right place! I changed the name of my blog from What We Do to
Pilgrims at Tinker Creek.

And, the web address for Pilgrims at Tinker Creek is changing to
www.pilgrimsattinkercreek.com
For most of you, the above URL should now take you to this blog. Copy and paste the address into your browser to see it it's working.

If you follow the original URL (lisalalalala.blogspot.com) you'll be re-directed by Blogger to the new domain. Eventually you'll need to simply replace that URL with www.pilgrimsattinkercreek.com

Thanks for your patience in this exciting new transition!



Outside:
Sycamores are one of the oldest species of tree on the planet.


And "our" mountains (the Blue Ridge) are ancient as well, older than the Rockies out west. Worn down from  rocky, craggy pinnacles as high as the Himalayas
to the much smaller, rounded  Appalachians we know today.

Every day we see an ancient mountain and an ancient species of tree along Tinker Creek.

But back to sycamores. My favorite "winter" tree to identify. The bark is sort of white, sort of mottled,    splotchy
patches of brown, green and gray.

And the fruit! All those round little brown balls! 
I just recently learned they're considered the fruit of the tree. And that some people call the sycamore the "buttonball" tree.



really, aren't they cute?
The balls break up into tiny seeds that feature little brown hairs that are scattered by the wind in late winter.

Inside:


Ana has been beading again- rings, this time.

She's amazing.
all photos in this post were taken by Ana
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